Homebrewing Munton’s Premium Best Bitter


Munton’s Premium Best Bitter

http://www.muntonshomebrew.com/premium-range/best-bitter/
Derived from Beginner instructions from “The Compete Joy of Home Brewing” – Charlie Papazain

But any bad advice is my own.

Introduction:

Years ago (15 to 25) I did some home brewing, but stopped about 15 years ago. The reason I brewed was not so much price. Home brew was, and still is, more expensive than cheep beer. The main reason I did it was that, on a trip to England I discovered English Bitter, but I couldn’t find it here in the US. I did find a local brewing supply store and they stocked malt extract kits for brewing Bitter. I continued to try styles of beer that were difficult to economically obtain at the time, heavier flavorful beers. I learned not to use corn sugar to increase the flavor and alcohol content of the beer, but to brew adding the extra sugar using malt extracts.

Today, there are many more choices of premium and crafted beers, available in many styles. There is less incentive to homebrew. But I think I can brew these for about ½ to 1/3 the price. I’d like to learn to tune the taste of about three styles of beer (a light [color] Ale, a Bitter, and a Porter/Stout) and tune the taste to something I like and can be proud of.  This sense of accomplishment is still a good reason to homebrew beer.

This post probably has too much detail, but I’m trying to remember what I did.

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An Alternative Extruder-Base Alignment Procedure for FlashForge Creator X


Bad Print 1

Figure 1. Bad area on bottom.

I’ve been having a lot of fun printing prototype pieces for a potential high altitude balloon box (more on that another time). Unfortunately this is a lot like the old days, when printers replaced typewriters. As I made corrections to a document, I’d reprint it. WYSIWYG was not really any help. The paper copy was always a little different. Suddenly I could go through reams of paper perfecting a small document. Unfortunately, I use my 3D Printer the same way, exploring new ideas and finalizing fits.

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Printing an Ogive Nosecone for Model Rockets

BT-50 Nose cone assembled

I took my own advice and bought the Flashforge Creator X 3D printer. It has two MK8 print heads, for printing two colors, and an aluminum plate. So far I like it. I’m using ABS plastic and so far have had no jams. I’ve replaces the Kapton(tm) build plate covering once so far. I beat it up after seven or eight builds. The initial instructions suggest a plate temperature of 90C. I’ve had better luck with parts sticking to the build plate at 110C.

 

My initial interest in 3D printing is to make model rocket nose cones with a capability of carrying small payloads. Getting a 3-D printer has given me a opportunity to develop some ideas. I’d like to have a nosecone that can carry small circuit board payload. The version described here does not have that capability, but it is a step toward that goal. It includes a shell of a nosecone. I’ve included some internal bulkheads, though I’m not sure they are needed. The nosecone needs to survive the launch pressures. The bulkheads will need to be reduced, but could be thickened, to carry a payload.

Printing a nose cone

Printing a nose cone

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